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Baron
Baron's picture

Roland, that's pretty cool ( manual). Sounds like it is really reliable. Looks similar to what I see on trucks and containers 

Baron
Baron's picture

So if you were to move your whole one man operation inside (Mill, forklift, storage, show room etc.) how big would the building need to b.... not oversize but just big enough? How much square footage does the heart of you operation take up?

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

That's a great question. I've just retired from my day job, so once I get past the HoneyDew list, I can spend more time on the saw (and once the weather gets better).

My sawmill is sitting in a 10X20 Costco tarp shed, just moved out of my shop (didn't have enough room for tools and mill in a 20'X26' shop).

My tractor is on the other side of the state, sitting in a 20' container. Without it, I don't have anything but winches and/or rented equipment to load with. I have jury-rigged a hand crank loader, that will work with smaller logs.

I don't have a showroom, but I guess I could use my shop for that; it's tall enough, I could use the first floor for the shop, and have a 1/2 floor for display.Woodworking tools around the edge (routers, bandsaw, workbench, hand and power tools, compound miter saw, etc) and tablesaw in the middle. One side is shelving for storage.

Forge and anvil are just outside the main shop door, in a small 8'X8' shed. I didn't want to try and vent the coal forge through the high roof. Need to set up the other anvil and grandson's vise in the forge shed.

So, overall, a 20X26 building, with a couple 10X20 sheds makes me believe I could work in a 30X40 building and have everything I need, but I don't think I could fit in something smaller. 

Baron
Baron's picture

Congrats on your retirement. Now you'll be working harder than ever except it will be on your schedule more and more. The forge and the anvils/vices could be outside under a lean-to style porch? He could make Staples for use in split planks instead of butterflies. Is he using Leg vices? They are the norm in eastern forges.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

"I didn't want to try and vent the coal forge through the high roof."

Not using charcoal?  Easy enough to make from sawmill residue, and no problems with smoke.  Tarp shed is a pretty good compromise.  At least it will protect the mill from the elements.  Whatever size you make a barn or shed, you'll never whish it was smaller!

Baron
Baron's picture

surprisesmiley'Postie Wisdom', and you are right again, for sure. What would it take to move you inside, mill and all?  Would you vent the engine or switch to juice if you have it ($1500).

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Plan is to vent the engine, then switch to electric when I can set up a suitable genset, which I'll power with wood gas.

Baron
Baron's picture

PO you are starting to sound like Roland. Wood Gas? Explain? Or were you crack'in a funny? Roland Mentioned 30 x 40 but I don't have a forklift so I need room for the loader. Maybe 40 x 40.

How high should I make the ceiling 10, 12, 14 ,16. Should I go three pallets high or two? 

Postie I like those 53' trailers where the sides are tarpaulins that can be lifted for loading cars and so forth. They look easy to access. 

Just curious why you don't bring juice to your site. Surely you aren't going anywhere soon and it would be a good investment. Are you too far from service?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

I'm serious about the wood gas.  Been looking at it for years.  Looks like a natural for sawmills.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYGKn12Weu4

http://www.resilience.org/stories/2010-01-20/wood-gas-vehicles-firewood-fuel-tank/

 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I don't have a leg vise yet, but I've been looking for a bargain one. So far, we've put things together with minimal investment; the 'shopping trips' to find parts is part of the fun.

Yeah, we are using coal, because he wants to end up welding for damascas blades; I think that propane won't get the heat needed for some of the steels, and charcoal may be more of a problem holding the heat long enough.

I do plan on charcoal to get the coal and coke started, however.

 

My sidewalls are 11' high, which gives me enough room to move things a bit. If I were doing it again, and could easily choose, I would add at least three feet.

The reason I chose 11' is the local codes let me build up to 525 square feet with an average roof height of 15' or less for a much cheaper permit. My building is 520 square feet, with an average roof heigth of just over 14'.

 

Baron
Baron's picture

Leg Vises Rock!

So the choices are 12', 14' or 16'. Your saying 15'......Roland which side do you fall to if it was your wallet?

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I would check local building requirements; like I said, mine was much cheaper to permit. With no plumbing or electrical, the premit was about $250.

But, that being said, when I see the little differences between different heights, I think of what I could do with a second floor for part of it?

If you have an 8' main floor, with a 10" joist holding the floor for the next floor, that leaves me only 2'2" on the edge for headroom; I'm too old to bend.

In the middle, where the ceiling is a bit higher, I have over 5'. so I can work with that for storage area.

If you do the same math, 8' main floor, 10" floor joist, then a 14' sidewall will still give you 5' at the edge if you do a partial second floor.

For me, that would be adequate, so I'd choose the 14' sidewall.

 

Baron
Baron's picture

Post Oakie that is a logical progression for many. Thanks for sharing those links and sorry about comparing you to Roland. 

Roland, it is likely to be 14' then. I would love to Share Blair's Private message to me but i need to get permission. In his usual flair he nails many of the important points.

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