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wayne busse
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Down on the farm.

some of the 100 plus ash tree tops.

 grass, outdoor and nature tree, sky, mountain, outdoor and nature

Bill
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I see some nice camp fires in your future.

wayne busse
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 The posts are black locust  set in  four feet of concrete and the beams are ash.   

The posts have 2" /4" tennon at the top.

 sky and outdoor grass, tree and outdoor

wayne busse
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  these are cross beams that will support the hoist

 

 

 

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 tree, sky, house and outdoor

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This is a load of walnut logs I was given.three 20' logs and four 14'. The timber buyer wouldn't come out for such a small load, I  got rid of them for the property owner. I didn't even charge him. lol

wayne busse
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My home made jack supports were tweeking the single hole in the bottom rail. I added the 2"  wide by 3/8" thick by 16" long plate- painted black. Now there are three holes used in the rail and no more tweeking.No automatic alt text available.

wayne busse
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some of the ash firewood for sale during pumpkin season

 

 

 

 train and outdoor

 

 

 

 sky, cloud and outdoor

 

 sawing some cedars out front while we were pouring crete for the the mill shed out back

wayne busse
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his black oak on the farm is one of the biggest i've ever seen .16' circumference three  feet off the ground ! It's going down hill-it will break my to see it die...  This is another black oak ,48 " at the base and over 40' to the first limb, it's on my list to saw in a couple years.

 

 tree, sky, plant, outdoor and nature tree, sky, plant, outdoor and nature

Bill
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Nice pics. Wayne TY for posting.

Bill
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Wayne you could let that big tree grow a few more years and really utilize it .laugh

wayne busse
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Wow Bill, I didn't know anything that big grew so far north. Are those notches where they stood on spring boards to fell the tree? Looks like it was a double trunk.

Bill
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Yes the notches are for spring boards. One the coast Wayne there are some very large trees. 

http://www.cathedralgrove.eu/text/01-Cathedral-Grove-1.htm

wayne busse
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Thanks for the link, Bill. I hope there are some left for our descendants to admire. I'd love to see them someday.

LATHAM FARMS
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Wayne, shame to loose so many trees so fast. we have lost over a thousand i im sure here on the farm. utilizing as much as we can in lumber and firewood, trying to get it before rot sets in. have the wood peckers started "flecking" the standing trees in your area yet ? it sure makes the ash stand out in the woods !

LATHAM FARMS
LATHAM FARMS's picture

Wayne, shame to loose so many trees so fast. we have lost over a thousand i im sure here on the farm. utilizing as much as we can in lumber and firewood, trying to get it before rot sets in. have the wood peckers started "flecking" the standing trees in your area yet ? it sure makes the ash stand out in the woods !

LATHAM FARMS
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always double post.... I only click submit once for real ! I think it has something to do with my satalite connection

wayne busse
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This summer the trees dropped their leaves and it won't be long before the woodpeckers start on the bark. In my experience, after standing dead for two years, the trees aren't even good for fire wood. If you cut the logs and get them off the ground they will still be good after a year or two but will have a few borer holes which are caused by a different bug. The ash borer only tunnels under the bark. 

It would have been nice to have few years to harvest the trees instead having to do it all in a year. We have thousands of smaller ash in the six diameter  range that will just go to waste. To bad we can't afford a special furnace to turn all the smaller ones into bio char-small pieces of charcoal that last hundreds of years when added to the soil. The Incas used it in all their food plots. The carbon allows beneficial fungi to grow which help root hairs to easily absorb nutrients in marginal soils.

Bill
Bill's picture

Wayne a furnace to make bio-char isn't expensive a friend of mine made one and it works great he didn't put a lot of money into it. Making some thing to grind up the char is a different story he's still working on it . I have a box full of it he gave me I have to crush up and get on the garden.

LATHAM FARMS
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bill, maybe a old feed grinder/ hammer mill with a modified screen ?

wayne busse
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The factory built one I saw used ground chips and coarse saw dust that was fed through the furnace on a conveyer . The set rate insured the charcoal remained unburnt, only driving off the wood gas which was captured and burnt as the source of heat.With the huge amount of wood and the large number o acres i'd need to cover , a simple setup would take too much time. We can only dream....

Bill
Bill's picture

LF that's exactly what I told my friend he should get and try they he could give me it bagged a ready smiley.

Wayne that would be just another business and a lot more work to deal with like me we all ready have enough irons in the fire.

oneoldcoot
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I see a lot of talk about fire wood and makeing charcoal. You might check out and see if there are any blacksmiths in your area that would love the trees for making their own charcoal. I know if I was in the area I would grab a boat load of it. PS you may get free knives or other cool sharp pointy things for it.

 

Funktionhouse
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I have given some thought to charcoal from our scraps but we utilize such a wide variety of species I fear issues with mixing them would create an inferior product 

Funktionhouse
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I have given some thought to charcoal from our scraps but we utilize such a wide variety of species I fear issues with mixing them would create an inferior product 

r.garrison1
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Funktionhouse,

I would look at it a different way!

Maybe store a sample of each one of the most common species you have, and use for cooking; see if there is any reason to NOT use that charcoal.

Then, create a 'craft brand' of charcoal, to sell locally for BBQ. Identify it as 'a mix of charcoals, with locally sourced wood'. Label it as the charcoal your grandpa's grandpa used to use!

Sell it as a premium product.

Funktionhouse
Funktionhouse's picture

I have considered the "local" "artisan" wood chip or charcoal thing. Our work load and limited property size would make it impractical to separate the species and some of them like camphor can be toxic when burnt. Great ideas require a lot of time and even more marketing, we are slowly bringing on employees to take on some of the work load which "should"  free me up to create and market new product lines. 

Additionally, our city will allow anybody to salvage brush and logs from the green waste dump sites. I could see a market outside our area though. Live Oak anyone? 

Our city has approached us to assist in developing an alternative use for s=the higher use waste. I hope to have the time to start on some ideas (bring me your logs) and a program format after the new year. 

 

P.S. Everything that goes out our door is a premium product cheeky

r.garrison1
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In Eastern Oregon, the local schools have recently set up a boiler system they expect to save them a ton of money in the long run. 

http://www.mckinstry.com/2008/09/01/biomass-fuel-to-save-enterprise-school-district-at-least-76000-per-year/

 

LATHAM FARMS
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I put in a boiler system last year and love it !! saving 2500 a year in propane. the whole set up cost about 6500. Burning them half rotten ash trees and saving the good ones for the mill and all mill scraps get used to. fill it once in the morning and once at night. oh and the thermostat is at 73 in the house (my wife dosent like our ohio cold lol).

LATHAM FARMS
LATHAM FARMS's picture

I put in a boiler system last year and love it !! saving 2500 a year in propane. the whole set up cost about 6500. Burning them half rotten ash trees and saving the good ones for the mill and all mill scraps get used to. fill it once in the morning and once at night. oh and the thermostat is at 73 in the house (my wife dosent like our ohio cold lol).

wayne busse
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There is a lot of competition here selling firewood since all the ash have died. To help sell the firewood I give each customer a wheel barrow full of thinner slabs split into kindling. They love the the free kindling. For folks that burn in an open fireplace , I give them a bunch of cedar slabs for aroma and they leave with a smile on their face.

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

I've been working on the saw shed the last few weeks. I didn't have enough money to buy metal for the roof so I fell back on what I know best . I've built more than 30 hoop houses in the last twenty years so it was easy to do. The pipe for the bows and purlins was under $300.00 and i had some left over poly so it was a no-brainer.This is the bending jig I use to bend the bows. I use a tape measure and sharpie to draw an arch on the plywood platform, then screw blocks of wood along the arch. I've made four different sizes; 12' 16' 20' and 24'. 1 person, smiling, sky, cloud and outdoorNo automatic alt text available. sky and outdoor

wayne busse
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This is one of the last twenty foot beams for the saw shed that is ready to flip with the hoist.  Bill , I couldn't find a strap but this 5/8 samson braid rope works great, one full turn and it grabs on to the log or cant with just a little tension. I flpped a couple 20' by 30" ash logs with no problem... I used the mill to cut the notch on the ends of the beams. I picked up the beams with the hoist and spun them end for end on the mill.           sky and outdoorNo automatic alt text available.

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