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Baron
Baron's picture
Eastern Red Cedar

I just returned from TN and while there I noticed allot of large ERC. What would I expect to pay/bd' slabbed into flitches.  I will be needing some more  soon and am thinking that it may be nice to bring some home the next time I visit TN. In PA it doesnt grow as wide as what I see growing down there. I'm thinking I would haul it un-stickered and freshly cut and then sticker it in my yard a few days later. I would likely coat all whitewood with bora-care.

 

Thoughts?

 

Baron

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Around here, southwestern Missouri, average run cedar sells for about $1.00 to $1.25 bd/ft.

Baron
Baron's picture

Hi Eddie,

How wide can it commonly be purchased without paying a premium? I'm interested in 15-20" flitches in 9/8", 6/4 and 8/4 for use in furniture. 

 

Does anyone know how durable it is as fencing if the whitewood is removed? would it compare to pressure treated? would it compare to Western Red Cedar or Redwood. We still have fenceposts in the ground here from 75-100 years ago and they are still fine to hold fence. All that is left is the heartwood but they are in the ground 2-3' and are still standing. Would 1" boards last well out in the weather?

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Eastern Red Cedar is extremely durable.  Shouldn't have problems with it rotting, espedially the heart wood.  Just hard to get good quality lumber.  No idea what you'd pay for it, though.  I pretty much use any cedar I cut, so I haven't tried to sell it.  You might check CraigsList for different parts of the country.  Here's a link to an ad near us (Joplin, MO) https://joplin.craigslist.org/grd/d/2-800bf-red-cedar-bundles/6404367594.html.  Maybe that will entice you to come over for a visit!

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

I agree with Dave on red cedar heartwood.  Don't know about 15"-20"  -   I bet they would want a premium for that.  In my experience, it's hard to find logs that big with solid and beautiful lumber all the way through.  Often there are pockets of bark, rot, or voids inside.  The younger stuff is usually prettier with the best color.  Of course, it may be different in Tennessee.

Baron
Baron's picture

The add that Dave showed is a pretty good deal. I'm not ready to buy now anyway so at least I'll have time to get educated, re-align my expectaions and develop sources. I've realized that I'm getting 3-4$ a board for for it at the shows I go to and in a year, at the rate I'm selling it now, I'll be getting low. I'll be hunting for flitches when I'm ready. Thanks for the comments.

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

 I've got some cedars in a pile off the ground that I cut two years ago. All the sap wood is riddled with powder post beetles. I'll have to saw all of it off when I mill them, the contrast is what I like best about cedar. It's a shame, buts I guess it's a lesson learned. Eddie is right, older cedars have a lot of rot in the center and are hard to find in that size. Another problem I learned the hard way is the seasoned logs crack and split down the length and when sawed the boards fall apart all over the place.

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I've been sawing a bit of cedar lately (other things have intervened, and I wish I was sawing more cedar), and I agree with the core rot, and the wood strength.

The logs I have been cutting have been down a while, and are starting pretty seasoned. The logs were cut a couple feet longer than my mill, so I'm trimming the ends.

If I flat saw, I get good grain. If I quartersaw, the split happens.

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

I've never seen powder post beetles in red cedar, for which I'm glad because they've been a problem for me in white oak and walnut - mainly in the sapwood, hackberry, hickory, and especially troublesome in red oak).  I've found tunnels and their grubs in freshly drying cedar sapwood, but the holes are big and the insects can be easily seen, unlike p.p.b.  Once the wood is dry, they don't seem to do further damage, also unlike p.p.b..  The information I have lists juniper bark beetle and black-horned juniper borer as pests of red cedar, but it could be ambrosia beetles that I have seen.  They leave open and bigger holes, whereas powder post beetle holes are small and filled with frass, evidence of damage already done.

Baron
Baron's picture

Yes generally I agree but now I have it in the sapwood of all that I have. The kiln seems to have taken care of it.... I thinkblush