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Timeout
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Found the limit of HD36.

Had some good size pine blow over a while back. Put a log on the mill with intent to get some 8x8s for future timber frame construction. I don't know what a 16' by average 30" green white pine weighs. Loading hydraulics wouldn't lift it. Needed to use the tractor and saw mill hydraulic combination.  Got down to 16" x 16" cant. Set up to split it and found some obstacles. Blade guard latch and board return wouldn't survive . Removed board return and tied up latch. I also had to offset cant from hydraulic rests to the manual. Still learning.

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

 How did the hydraulics do turning the log?  I've had my mill three years and I still learn something new each time I use the mill, usually the hard way...

Timeout
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The whole operation was a head scratcher. After finessing the log onto the mill , I found the log about 6 " too far down the bed. I raised the rollers and tried pushing back with a 4x4 as a lever. No go. The log had indented into the rollers. After some finagling I got some short boards between the log and the rollers. Still couldn't push it by hand. Hooked up winch from tractor and dragged it ahead. Got the boards out and set it down. Added some Pinesol to the water jug and sawed a bark slab. Brought it back and sawed a 1" board. Time to turn it . I like to turn it 180 so I get 2 parallel sides. The log turner worked good . Had to watch that I didn't get hung up on the log rests. At one point I used the hydraulic dog to hold the log while I got a better bite with the turner. I tried not to crash the log on the bed. Took awhile but finally got it setting flat side on the bed. Took another 2 cuts. Slab and a 1" board. Turned it 90 degrees. Had some fun trying to get plumb. I use a level on the rest side. Log dog wouldn't push it plumb to the rests. Had to get out the cant dog and 2 wedges. Ready to saw. Another slab and board.  Turned it 180 degrees. Another slab and board. All sides are flat. 17" x 18" cant. Sawed another board. Turned it 90 degrees and sawed 2 more boards. Got to get better using the log dog to turn cant. The turner chain really staved up the soft pine. Now I am at the point of previous post. Lessons learned. Pay attention to log position before loading. Don't use log turner on finished lumber. Figure out what you want from the log before sawing. Still learning. 

Timeout
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Photo of  problem encountered. Rubber latch is resting on cant.

 

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Timeout
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Photo of board return.

 

 outdoor

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

 One of the frustrating  limitations of the mill is the depth of  cut. Bigger band wheels and a different design of the head would give a deeper cut , but then the mill would be more expensive. We all wish we had enough cash laying around to buy a $40,000.00 woodmizer.  If you are like me,  I can't  justify spending that much on a mill that I don't use every day of the week to make a living with.

The ruff bark does not like to roll on anything, but ball bearings on the toe boards would have helped some. Planning ahead is the best solution, If the log has a lot of flair, I let the big end fall between the bunks so I usually don't have to raise the small end as much or at all. After twenty thousand bdft or so this will all be rote. The school of hard knocks is always the best and always aggravating...

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

When I want to move a log up or down the mill, I have two short 2" steel pipes. I lift the log, set the pipes across the rails, and use those as rollers for the log. I then lift the log, pull the pipes, and I'm ready to cut. I usually use a cant hook or peavy to lift the log. I have been known to use a ramp for the job; heavy, but a 6' long lever is a good thing to have.