You are here

13 posts / 0 new
Last post
W.C. Metzing
W.C. Metzing's picture
Resawing for molding

I bought my Norwood a couple years ago but this is my first time on the forum. I've been reading the post and feel like I know most of the regulars and have appreciated all the good advice. Now I have a question of my own. I am preparing to make some molding and have some 6/4 red oak that has been kiln dried. If I resaw it  on my mill down to 3/4 minus the blade,  and expose the center, will that cause it to cup?  Thanks for any feedback

Bill
Bill's picture

Sure a good looking helper you have there. 

  I found oak to be very susceptible to the surrounding environment so unless vacuum packed it takes on moisture easily. There are also a no. of other factors to consider eg. where the tree grew , elevation & climate so any info your given won't be written in stone. It may start to curl right off the saw but if it doesn't what has worked for me is lay it out flat in your shop. Then every hour or so flip it for the first day then less often until it stabilizes. You'll know when that is because it will stay flat. If it stays flat from the get go great but if not this is my solution. Others here have far more experience than me and may have better ideas. Best of luck looking forward to hearing how it turns out.

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

How heavy is the moulding? I have used oak moulding, and found it reasonably flexible when installing; a little cupping won't hurt if it is 3/4" X 1" or less, but if it is over 2", then it can be hard to overcome when you install.

 

One trick I've learned; when I take some wood off one side, I also take some off the other. Don't shave off one side only; that will make the cup worse.This is because the newly exposed wood will cure at a different rate than the wood that was exposed for a while, and therefore shrink faster.

 

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

I doubt that it will cup much if it was kiln dried.  Your main problem will probably be getting a straight cut through the center of the board.  Resawing dried hardwood on the mill is sometimes problematic (i.e. blade wander).  Go slow.

W.C. Metzing
W.C. Metzing's picture

Thanks guys for your feedback. The molding will end up at 7/16. I didn't want to take a 4/4 board down that far because of the extra time and waste so i wondered if I could get two out of one 6/4 by slicing it down the middle. It sounds a little too risky and I may end up wasting some good 6/4 oak. Oh and Bill, that's not my helper in the picture, that's my boss. He's a good boss though, when he shows up I get to take a coffee break and hang out with him for a spell.

Bill
Bill's picture

yes Good boss. I'd give it a try but only if the 4/4 was dead straight it may be a task better preformed on a vertical band saw.

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

What shape is the moulding? Will an angle cut make it easier?Say you are making base moulding, and the base is 7/16, and the top is 1/4.

Make the cut at a bit of an angle, so both strips you end up with have a wide and narrow side. That way, your moulding cutter or router will have less material to cut, as an additional benefit.

W.C. Metzing
W.C. Metzing's picture

Thanks, The molding will be a 3 1/4 crown. But that's a good idea for base i never thought of. I'll keep that in mind it may come in handy for the future.

Bill
Bill's picture

You could just rip off 1/2"  of the material and have some 1/2" strips to play with some where rather than waste as well.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Since it is kiln dry, it should't move much when you resaw it.  How flat is the stock?  I resawed 1200 board feet of 8/4 walnut a while back.  I built a jig with clamps to hold the boards fast to the crossbunks, and had to move the clamps as the blade when through so that the board was held on both sides of the cut.  Time consuming, but it worked.

Bill
Bill's picture

kilim dry won't make any dif. with oak that hasn't been kept in a real dry place is my experience with it it takes on moisture from the suroundings I had KD 6' oak shrink 3/8" when installed on a wall inside after being keep out a few wks. one winter.

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Bill, you're right about shrinking and expanding in width, but I think most of the cupping damage takes place in the early drying stages as it dries down to 6-8%.  But I imagine if you soaked a board, it would cup some more as it dries.

Bill
Bill's picture

I must say Eddie these boards sure stayed flat I just was surprised at the shrinkage I'd sprayed the wall flat black before installing and it was a good thing white would have meant doing it over. This happened to be in an office for a lumber yd. that supplied it :o).