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Bill MacLellan
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EM thanks, for the advise. I google'd the horse chestnut and it appears it is very similar to popular. I don't think I will take that venture any further.

Post Oakie
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OK, here's the link on how to post photos. http://forum.norwoodsawmills.com/suggestion-box/posting-photos

Another thing to consider is to look for dead trees, or trees marked for removal by utility companies and talk directly to the home owner.

Norwood makes a carbide bi-metal band saw blade that will cut through the log stops, if you want to shorten them.  Seriously, I use them on logs that may have metal in them, and they do work, but they're pricy.

Kiln would be a good addition, but you might wait to see how the sawmilling works out.  Buying a sawmill does take a leap of faith, but Chicago is big enough to support a number of mills, and if you can get yourself a niche market for recovered/recycled lumber, you will do well.  Another source is beams from old buildings being dismantled.  I understand resawn salvaged beams are in high demand.  Just be ready for very hard wood & lots of nails.

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

You asked about a home made log arch; I've been mulling over getting the rear axle of a small front wheel drive car, and using that. Just pull the log over the axle, maybe with some kind of winch mounted to my Polaris Ranger.

Once on the axle, strap it down, and tow.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

That "just pull the log over the axle" has me curious.  How do you plan to do that?  The winch would have to lift and pull the log forward at the same time. Then again, there's unloading the log, too..  Get that worked out, and you'll have a good way to move logs.  I think that's why most arches use stub axles so they can lift the log up into the frame.  I hope you'll post some sketches & photos.

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

U-tube has a few good examples of log arches.

I thought the gielies farm arch looked good, it can be found by typing in gileis farm log arch in the search bar. .

You can buy spindles and hubs from northern tool for about $60.00 each.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Another half-hour spent watching Youtube videos... thanks.  Seriously, if you're a good welder, that design looks good.  Even made his own tongs!  Mounting the axle in one piece, then cutting it to make the stubs is a brilliant way to make sure they are perfectly aligned.  Put a remote control 12 Volt winch on that thing, and you might even be able to hook up to a log without getting off the tractor.  Thanks for posting the link.  Looks like a good way to get logs to the sawmill.

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

I did not think of mounting the full axle then cutting it.

I was going to get two spindles and hubs the weld i together..

I am a fair to poor welder so the full axle is a good idea.

Not sure where to get a full axle . I could canabliize one if I could find an old heavy duty trailer.

I have paint issues with my log trailer, will post pics when finished. I think I have a good design.

 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

My plan with the straight axle is to have an A frame mounted to the corners, near the hubs. The center is only a couple feet tall; maybe less. The tongue of the trailer needs to be a bit longer than the A frame; probably at least a couple feet longer (I haven't thought through exactly how much force will be on the parts).

The winch is on the hitch. I pull up until the axle is about the distance from the axle to the ground (if it clears 10", I stop 10"+ short of the log). That leaves the log free to move forward a bit while being winched.

Then, when I winch the log, the A frame pulls it up and forward. This should also center the log, but I'll probably have guides on the axle to keep it from rolling side to side.

One thing I haven't thought through is how to unload. 

The shorter the A frame, the less force on the cable and winch, but the smaller log it will handle.

 

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

If you look on utube for the gieles farm arch it has an idea on how to lift and unload the log.

He lifts with a winch then holds with a chain, then removes the winch..

To remove: he winches up removes the chain then lowers log with the winch..

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Mates:

I bit the bullet today and ordered the LM 29. How long will it take to put together?

I plan on mounting it on a 16 foot car trailer. I plan on repainting the trailer orange to match the sawmill.

This past weekend I got my log trailer, ( know as the log grabber 5000) , and picked up a few saw logs.

It was a lot of work. I think my design worked well. I will post pic as sook asI can figure out how to do it.

Will get a few more saw logs with in the next week.

Getting excited to start sawing.

 

Baron
Baron's picture

You are going to love it Sawyer Dave. Wait until you open your first Log.

As far as how long it takes to put together it will be three two-day sessions where you assemble it then completely disassemble it three timessmileywink. That is unless you are like the other members and them you'll be able to assemble it in a weekend or less.

Time will tell whether or not you like the mill up on a trailer. Make sure the trailer is very stiff or you may end up with contorted boards. Use a level....allot. I don't know how you will roll your logs with it up in the air but you'll figure it out and have a blast doing so.

Sawyer Dave, Its got a ring to it.......send Pics.

 

 

machamillion
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Took me and a helper about 18 hrs to assemble my lm29 with trailer and log loader with 4 ft extention.

Max

clam lake dave
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Log Grabber 5000 photo 0504151720a_zpsqbsted9l.jpg

 

Here is the Log Grabber 5000 that I made. It worked!

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

More detail of the Log Grabber 5000

 

Design of Log Grabber 5000 photo 0504151721_zpsfjz6b1cs.jpg

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

 photo 0504151721a_zpsvdtq5hyc.jpg

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Removablewinch photo 0504151720b_zps2vbpmwib.jpg

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

The first logs I pulled with the Log Grabber 5000 !!

It was a lot of work even with a winch.

 

First Logs photo 0504151720_zpsef6dk8is.jpg

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Before the primer, after the welding.

 

Before primer photo 0418151803a 2_zpsl4baoxzh.jpg

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I like it!  yes

Bill
Bill's picture

Very nice job Dave yes. Good looking trailer.

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

Great idea! does the rack remove so you can still drive stuff on. The finished product looks great, what type of welding rod is that in the last picture wink

Have you got the mill together yet, looking forward to see that set up as well.

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

I can see a couple of pins on the bottom of the frame so the frame is designed to come off. Looks great ! The jacks on the back end are a must have... Years ago I had a backhoe delivered in front of the house on the street which had a pretty good incline. When the hoe backed up on the trailer the back end of the truck came off the ground and away it went- strait down the hill towards the lake at bottom. I managed to outrun the truck ,jump in and stand on the brakes. Of course only the front brakes so the the rig jacknifed into the neighbors yard destroying the tongue on the trailer and the fender as the hoe bounced off sideways. The rental company was so happy I kept the equipment out of the lake they gave me the rental for free. If only someone had filmed it, but that was before everyone had a camera in their pocket. The rig was really  moving by the time I hit the breaks and just missed a big tree- what an adrenaline rush. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

Ahh! yes I can see the other pins or sleeve there now, didn't see them the first time around. Dave post a couple of pics when you are loading some logs. I take it you winch the log up onto the deck, then support the log with the chain so you can take a second bite on it ? Or do you simply winch it up the deck, and the three hooks are to allow logs to load on different sides as needed.

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Bill,

The back rack come off. It is a bit heavy, but I can do it by myself.

When I winch the logs I have a steel ramp in the back that gets the log to the lip of the trailer.

Then I remove the pully from the eye hook on the rack and continur winching.

The only trouble was the tongs some times get loose. I may use a chain in the future or a wire choker.

to off load the logs, I put a 20 foot toe strap attound a sturdy treeany hook the pully to the toe strap then hook the tongs to the end of the log and start winching.

I use the ramps with a piece of plywood to help it slide down.

I am thinking that I can use the toe strap on the tree and hook a chain on the log and then drive the truck and trailer away and let the tree hold the log when I drive and let gravity take over.

My LM29 is coming next week. I am working on the trailer it will be going on.

I may get to paint it tonight or tomorrow. Painting the trailer Kobota ogange. I thought I read that is the same color that norwood uses.

Looking forward the the delivery.

sawdoc
sawdoc's picture

Dave - Here's my version of a trailer loading arch. Mine uses C-clamps to mount it to the trailer frame and loading is done with a Harbor Freight 12 v winch. I have a home-made skidding plate that doubles as a loading ramp, and when the loading is done, everything breaks down for travel. In the photos, we are loading western white pine logs of various lengths. The one photo of an almost full trailer is Douglas-fir.

Sawdoc

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Saw Doc,

Very cool. I like the idea of the skid plate.

What did the skid plate/loading ramp come from.

What do you do to unload the logs?

Did you make a log arch for your 4 wheeler?

How is the spare tire mounted on the side of the trailer?

My winch is a 5000 lb from harbor freight How big is yours?

 

sawdoc
sawdoc's picture

Hi Dave,

I built the skidding plate from a piece of 18"x24" 1/4" steel plate. I heated it at about the 1/3 line with an acteline torch and beat it with a sledge hammer to make a bend in the plate. There is a 1 inch steel bar welded across the end, which bites into a log when chain binders are used to secure a log. I built the unit for skidding logs with an ATV. I also built a logging arch, but sometimes the skidding plate is quicker and easier to use. When turned upside down, the 1 inch bar fits into the tailgate groove of the trailer, to serve as a loading ramp.

I have a Kubota tractor with front end loader that I use to unload the logs, using either a small choker, or logging tongs.

I built a modular logging arch for both moving logs by hand and for use with an ATV.  It comes in handy removing logs from people's yards.

I carry two spare tires on my trailer. To mount a tire, I welded two wheel studs on an upright post which is part of the trailer box frame.

I have a couple of different ways I winch logs. If it is a small job, I use a 3,000 lb electric winch. If I have to pull the logs a greater distance, or if there are quite a few logs, I use a Lewis Winch mounted on a Stihl 044 chainsaw.

Sawdoc

 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Sawdoc, you're my hero! You got all the fun toys, made by hand.

machamillion
machamillion's picture

Sawdog,

great builds. Looks like the whole family having fun. I love the skidding plate/loading ramp idea.

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Saw doc, 

Great ideas, Better builds. 

 

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