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r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I've found that one of the reasons that high speed hardened bits dull is because of pitch and other things building up on the bit.

If I keep it protected with something that resists that buildup, I get better cuts for longer. You don't need to keep a fluid live while cutting, just watch the buildup and try and keep it clean.

 

Baron
Baron's picture

70/30 is much better and in time I'd push it even harder. 

That router bit seems like a great opportunity.

 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

One thing I've done for bits in real bad shape; soak them in bleach, then hit them with a wire brush and replace the bearing. The bearings don't last after the bleach soak, but the resins are so brittle the brush cleans them off very easily. 

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

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The CNC has been working>

Getting a hang of it.

When you think you have it figured out there is a curve ball.

Having fun with the logs I cut!

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

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Baron
Baron's picture

Looks very creative. Wish I had time to finish a few projects. Nice job Dave. Pretty cold there now I guess.

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

It has been cold.

I was in the unheated barn last night  to put a few boards through the jointer and my fingers seemed to get numb.

 

 

I have to figure out the best way to put finishes on the signs.

I used poly it has bubbles that you can feel. the wipe on poly needs too many coats. the spray on poly needs more coats and is expensive.

perhaps I can try tung oil next.

I buffed one of the signs with rouge and white diamond then wax. couldn't get in the lettering.

Open for suggestions.

Finishing has never been my strong suit.

The CNC is a really cool addition to the sawmill (money pit).

Just took delivery of  a moulder , Shop Fox W1812

Purchased a 3hp shaper and a 6"jointer all Grizzly tools

Baron
Baron's picture

May I borrow the jointer for the winter?  Did u spring for the spiral head in the jointer and planer?

I've been getting to know this new finish that I discovered on the net. One part turpentine, one part stain or sealer and one part alkild varnish such as marine spar varnish. Wipe it on and then wipe it off in twenty minutes. Do this once a day for 8 days and the Finish builds to a nice 3D finish. When I use pure poly urethane. You want to apply when the temps are falling. Wood outgasses when it is sealed and rising in temp. So a piece of wood that you had off by itself near a wall or on the floor, once placed on your work Bench under a light will be out gassing as it warms up. So lay your wood out in a warm area let it warm up for a couple hrs. Varnish it and turn the heat back and lights out. On my sailboats I would do prep work all day and once the sun gets over the building an your in the shade I'd switch to varnishing. Id use narrow foam brushes to suck all the excess varnish out of the grooves and wide foamies to stiple off any bubbles. Brush away from the direction your walking towards and you'll rarely leave brush marks. 

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

To cheap for the  spiral head. I probably made a mistake.

I will try the idea of the foam brushes.

Easy clean up !

Baron
Baron's picture

Before we knew of the spiral or helical head planers we didn't think twice of how nice it was to have a planer. Now when I use my woodmaster i just cherish the fact that I won't have to change and adjust and accurately touque those long and easily chipped blades. Makes me smile it does!

Bill
Bill's picture

Those are really nice signs Dave . 

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Thanks,

The computer does the work after the program is made.

Bill
Bill's picture

Well Dave your doing great a friend of mine bought one 6 mons. ago and he's yet to have mastered doing anything with it.

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

Great signs Dave, what a great way to use short stuff that would normally end up in the stove. Sounds like you're getting a great set of shop tools. We bought a 16"  planer last spring. We got a couple big nicks in the blades. I suspect blade teeth points from the band mill. We found two of the offending pieces . I think we'll by a second planer just for the last pass.

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Wayne,
What type of planer did you get?
I have a 13 inch Wen. There is an outlet store by me.
Seems to do OK so far. Will need to upgrade when I start to surface the lumber.

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Great signs, and pix.

 

One trick I've used for cold shops is to use some brooder lamps or something that heats the surface in the shop when I'm working. If the equipment soaks up the cold, it really pulls the heat out of your hands. Just a little surface heat can make a difference.

 

Baron
Baron's picture

Roland we used those infrared heat bulbs in our milkhouse to keep the pipes from freezing and I know what you mean about them saving your hands. 

Bill I understand your friends plight. If it takes a computer I'm likely not to do very well with it.

Dave and Wayne, check out the spiral and helical head planers when you guys upgrade. Its like a miricle.....quiet, smooth, small chips. four edges per tooth. I have the Woodmaster but shop fox, Grizzly and most others also offer these options. 

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

The 16" Jet does a nice job but I don't like the deep snipe the under rollers cause. We also have a problem with long curly chips which block the shoot and dust collector pipe.

Baron, sounds like the spiral cutter may be the answer.

Baron
Baron's picture

 

This from the Jet site. If you order the optional helical head for your 16" then you won't need a second planer. If you chip a blade just grab an allen wrench and rotate the offended blade 90 degrees, retourque it, and get going again. you get 4 sharp sides on each tooth and it would be a rare thing to damage more than one tooth at a time. It sure puts a new spin on planing.

 

 photo planer-helicalhead-tab2_zpsj9xjbksz.jpg

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Very good-looking signs, Dave.  If you use a good polyurethane at warm temperature, don't stir it too vigorously and refrain from over-brushing, bubbles shouldn't be a big problem (but it sounds like Baron knows more about it than me); you might try thinning it too.  I have a 15" straight knife planer I got from Grizzly's outlet store for $600, but would like to have spiral cutters, especially for quarter-sawn and difficult grain (tear-out).  The only negative I know of with the spiral/helical is that they take a little more power to do the same job as the knife planers.  Not a big problem though.  Oh, and they cost significantly more.  Merry Christmas all.

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Thanks Eddiemac,

Looking back I probably over brushed the poly.

There is a learning curve for everything.

 I will save my money for a bigger planer. I still think I am too cheep to buy a Jet planer, will continue to look at the Grizzly.

Since I will be building a new shop I guess having a few more 220 outlets wont be that big of a problem.

Merry Christmas

Baron
Baron's picture

Dave, you might also look for a separate feed motor with rheostat for infinitely variable feed. My unit runs a 1/6 hp 110v motor to feed and a 5hp 220v to plane. 

Happy holidays to all. 

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

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