You are here

504 posts / 0 new
Last post
Baron
Baron's picture

SawDoc what gauge steel and hardness did u use?  

sawdoc
sawdoc's picture

I have had some sort of backyard sawmill for the past 40 years, starting with an Alaskan mill attached to a 700 McCulloch chainsaw that I used to flatten log house purlins. I progressed up through a variety of mills until I finally settled on a Norwood about 10 years ago. It has always been my pleasure to build the tools I need. That may also be a tribute to my Scotch blood. My mill is a Norwood LL24 mounted on a trailer I specifically built to carry a sawmill. At 71, I am no longer trying to make money with my mill, but continue to refine my toys. I also am always willing to share my ideas. For example, here is the cad drawing I made when I designed my logging arch.

Bob

Baron
Baron's picture

I meant for the skid plate. 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Nice.. both the log arch and the skid plate, though the skid plate must weigh at least 40 pounds!  Lewis winch is one powerful tool, and you never have to worry about the battery.  Pricy, but worth it!

Baron
Baron's picture

IS It just hot-rolled steel? How thick?

Bill
Bill's picture

TY for sharing Bob I always enjoy your posts.

sawdoc
sawdoc's picture

Baron,

I went to Pacific Steel and asked for a piece of 1/4" x 24" x 36" plate. I assume that it is hot rolled. In this photo you can see how I bent it after heating it to cherry red with my rosebud torch, and then placing the end up on a piece of 4x4 and pounding it with a sledge hammer to create the bend. I also welded a length of 1/4" x 2" bar to the leading edge that bites into the logs when the chain binder is applied.

Bob

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Bob, I bet there will be quite a few skid  paltes make in the near future based on your design.

How did you attach the chains?

Do you think cutting teath in the bar would help keep the logs attached when youi are skidding them?

sawdoc
sawdoc's picture

Dave - There are holes drilled in the ends of the cross bar, and the leading edge of the plate. I attach short chains to the cross bar with D-ring clevis pins and a chain binder uses these to secure a log. More clevises at the front secure chains for pulling. When the unit is pulled with the ATV, it elevates the butt of the log and you would be surprised at the obstacles you can go over with it while dragging a log.

Bob

Baron
Baron's picture

Nice looking deal. I like to save the customers turf when reasonable and this would help allot when retreiving logs accross lawns.

Bob Have you tried moving the main anchor points lower on the forward end of the plate so that you are pulling from lower, thereby lifting it more, increasing traction to the quad? 

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Bob, I will be building one as soon as I can get my hands on the steel plate.

Do you think a few teeth cut in the bar would help hold the log or do you think it is not necessary.

sawdoc
sawdoc's picture

Dave - I suppose that cutting teeth in the bar would give a better bite on the log, but I have never had a log slip after binding it. My homemade tools are all about functionality and when something works, I quit working on trying to improve the tool. The old saying of "Leave well enough alone" comes to mind.

Bob

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Bob,

Roger that!

My sawmill is scheduled to be delivered today. I am excited.

Will post pics as I have a trailer that i thinwill work well and it is painted orange.

Dave

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

 photo 0512151157a_zpsdttzcwt3.jpg

 

Mates:

How many of you remember a picture like this ? Getting you saw mill delivered.

Lots of parts and pieces.

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

 photo 0512151159a_zpsl4dypahq.jpg

 

A happy camper!

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

In the barn ready for assembly photo 0512151230_zpsod7attdu.jpg

 

Inside the barn ready for assembly.

Baron
Baron's picture

Congrats Dave! Thanks for sharing and I do remember a shot like that.

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

 photo 0512151159_zpsq30mz2bp.jpg

 

The other half of the Double "D" Sawmill

Baron
Baron's picture

The other half looks like she has reservations just like my other half did. Before you know it she'll be out-milling you.

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

It was a tough sell. Especially since we dont have our own trees.

I took you advise and jumped in.

I have recieved a few offers for saw logs.

Going to pick up a white oak today.

I have a line on ash from local city.

Need to build the mil,l start sawing, then build the solar kiln and finally my work shop.

Loking forward to the challange.

Baron
Baron's picture

Sawyer Dave,

I found it fun to put the mill together. I don't know what your back is like but I found it helpful to raise the build up to me so that I wasn't bending over when assembling the mill. "Bush Hog Bill Armstrong" said his typical "just take your time" statement and it was the best advice I got. Initially I tried to use power tools to assemble but I wasn't watching carefully enough and got some bow in the mill. Then I switched to one wrench and one ratchet and tightened by the schedule like they point out in the manual. For the Rails I tightened them three times like when you mount a tire on a car......three times around. Wear gloves or you'll skin all of your knuckles in no time. There were some frustrations and calls to the home office but in a few days I had a mill with a large capacity that works very nicely. 

Congrats on the logs that you received. They'll keep coming.

Wishing you the best!

Baron

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Baron,

Thank you for the sage advice.

I will go slow durring assembly. I have build many things that I had to redo, with age hopefully comes wisdom and paticence.

I plan on building the mill on the trailer that is in the pictures.

I will get the harbor mill truck crain and mount that to the trailer and install an electric winch to winch the logs on the mill.

I saw a person do that on utube with another sawmill. It will be cheaper that the norwood hand operated winch.

Bill
Bill's picture

Looking forward to watching your progress C L Dave. Nice trailer !!!

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Mates got this logzilla on the trailer. Broke the welds on the winch.

What size logs do most of you cut? This log was a bit over 16 feet. I plan on cutting it in half.

It was very heavy it elevitated the rear of my truck when driving home. Rewelded the winch supports. Lost out on a pile of logs I thought I could get. 

The log is a white oak.

Baron
Baron's picture

Dave what is that ole'snag. Looks like it needs some Love'in. Keep it up.  

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

May get two more logs tomorrow or Friday.

How many logs does everyone cut each time you fire up the mill?

I am trying to get an idea of how many logs I need to stock pile before my first cut.

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Mates

How many of you had business cards made?

I got mine from vista print for 15 dollars delivered.

 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Nice white oak log.  Good one to test everything out.  My only suggestion would have been to cut it in half before loading.  Less weight to load at one time & it give you the chance to balance the trailer.  I'm not fond of moving tail heavy trailers.  The hitch isn't made for that & it makes the steering squirrely.

Minimum number of logs to have decked up before cutting is 1.  Start out with some low quality logs so you don't lose any valuable lumber while getting the hang of milling.  You'll need some 6x6 blocking and stickers for drying the good lumber, so start with that.  Be sure to check the tracking by turning the blade by hand before firing up the sawmill.  First time I used the mill, I threw off the blade (and put a kink in it) before it even touched the wood!

Number of logs per day varies, but I go through a typical (10' long, 16" diameter) oak log in about 30 minutes.  I probably average around hours sawing in an 8 hour day.  That's two band saw blades, if I don't hit any nails or log stops.  You'll pick up some good logs, and lose out on others.  That's all part of it.  And you'll get to where you can quickly size up a situation and decide whether a log is worth your time, or should be cut into firewood.  Good luck.  Looks like you're off to a great start!

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

Thanks for the words of encouragement Oakie!!

clam lake dave
clam lake dave's picture

 photo 0518151504 3_zpsb4e3kuje.jpg

Got a log on my birthday.

Need to finish building the mill to get it cut up.

Found a spot with a few more logs that are hard to get, I think it will be worth the effort so I can practice sawing on them.

Not exactly sure of the type of tree.

I did get a book that helps identify trees in all seasons. Will read that cover to cover.

Pages