You are here

89 posts / 0 new
Last post
Baron
Baron's picture

I just cant imagine how nice it would be to have it all put together. No fabrication needed, Rope instead of chain. Wow. Of course we'll expect some reports on your adventures.

Bill
Bill's picture

I certainly wouldn't be concerned pulling a log with a rope chances of it breaking are no different than a cable if the log is snagged up and a lot easier and faster to release if it does with that stile of winch. I know with my Warn winch the switch has stuck a few time either winding in or out a caused me some grief. Also the cable gets jaggers and had be very hard on the hands.

Baron
Baron's picture

When I lived in the redwoods everyone wore cotton chore gloves with a gauntlet. The cable jaggers catch on the cotton and rarely penetrate. Whereas jaggers always seem to enter the leathers palm work glove. I forget what they were called. Red something or another.....

Capstan winches are also available in horizontal versions. 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Bill,

 

I think what Baron is talking about for the rope is that it stretches, so if you have any weight on the end when it comes undone, it is like a slingshot coming at you.

I've never thought about it much, but I think I'll keep his advice in mind. I'm pretty good with knots, so it won't be too hard.

Bill
Bill's picture

Yes I agree RG good point ,I actually have a clevis attached to a long rope and use a sling or piece of chain on the end. The type of rope used does have a lot of stretch & can release a lot of kinetic energy. My use for it is pulling large trees with a bad lean the wrong way , a little tension with a come along and the stretch will pull a very large tree the right way & I only have to attach the sling as high as I can reach.   

Gasman10175
Gasman10175's picture

My neighbor just gave me permission to take all his leaners and drops on his 40 acres so I am going to order that Skid Winch by Monday and will send a photo or two and document my impressions once I have it on the tractor..

 

Thanks all

 

Baron
Baron's picture

You may also want to get an extra sling and a block made for rope. That way you can divert logs sideways occasionally in order not to damage other healthy trees. 

Gasman10175
Gasman10175's picture

I Will add a couple of nylon slings and a snatch block when I place the order

 

Thank you

Baron
Baron's picture

Sounds like allot of fun. 

Baron
Baron's picture

I will send you a wake up email in mid april to wake you just in case you do hibernate. When you say"fan" are you referring to a snowblower?  When do you stop working outside?  Or do you skid in winter. ?

Halling51
Halling51's picture

Snowblower....

I work a lot outside in the winter too. Below 10-15 C is as far I can do couse of damage on equipment. And are settling in the woodshop during the days and otherwise relaxing on the sofa when I am not on the computer!

The best time skidding is during the wintertime. Working in the forrest is best when you have the snow on the ground, and use branches when you drive on not leveled ground. Trees is also more easy to handle then. Normally it can be down to -20 - 25 doing this. Work keeps you warm. And makng firewood make you warm at least 3 times... The rest is work to keep my 2 km road open all winter. With the blower it takes me just half an hour. And 15min more around the houses. Two years ago I was doing the road from mid January till the mid March every day. A few days up to 3 times a day... Beat that?

 

Baron
Baron's picture

Oops. That was meant for Steinar. 

Baron
Baron's picture

Wow no thanks. I guess you can't really leave mid winter. 

Gasman10175
Gasman10175's picture

wow I thought I had it rough averaging 100" of snow per winter.....I will plow this year with my plow truck ( nice and warm ) instead of the tractor ( no cab ) with a front blade pushing and a back blade dragging. Takes about 1-1.5 hours for a 6" storm.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

I've had good luck with amsteel polymer winch lines.  It is stronger than steel, and has less stretch (less snapback if something lets go).  Downside is that it might get sliced on a sharp rock, but I have never had that problem.  It felt strange to use the poly line at first, but after a while I learned to trust it, and it has never let me down.  Not sure what Norwood uses, but it could be replaced, if necessary.  I can't see using steel cable on a capstain winch.

Baron
Baron's picture

As an ex arborist I greatly second the motion in favor of today's high tech lines.  Check out New England Rope and Samson Ropes for more details.

Post Oakie you coined the cliche that I was searching for: "snap back". Snap back is what will drive a hook through a skull, knock a man off a cliff, snap a leg like a toothpick and so on. Early in the modern rope development (Nylon and so forth) Snap Back was a big issue.  The rope era has now evolved to where you can select your lines for very specific purposes and qualities.  If you are a climber you want stretch.  If you are lowering a shock load (tree removal) you want moderate stretch.  If you are winching you want little stretch.

 

TJames
TJames's picture

Baron,

 

You have just educated me on the type of rope I need to be looking at.

I was looking at climbing rope for a capstan winch because I thought it may be stronger than other types.  The streching issue had never entered my mind.

Thanks for the heads up.  I don't have a capstan winch yet, but I am considering adding one to my tractor soon.

 

Thanks,

 

Todd

Halling51
Halling51's picture

I would like to know the data and name of the rope we talk about?

I have now -20Celsius and 2 feet of snow. All came down since Saturday.

Baron
Baron's picture
Baron
Baron's picture

It is amazing how the industry evolved in the last 40 years. When I started climbing in 1976 I was issued a Manila   Climbing line and was told by the reputable nationwide Company that I was working for that it was allot safer than nylon. Hmmm, Funny thing , then why we're the lowering lines we had not Manila.

Todd,when you get that let me know, as I'd like to drop by to see it. 

TJames
TJames's picture

Baron,

 

I think we need to get together some time soon, whether I have the skid by then or not.  You have a tremendous amount of knowledge that I would like to usurp from your brain.  I am currently in the Far East.  Should be home this weekend sometime.  After I get the "List" done, maybe we can get together for a meal somewhere and compare notes.

 

Todd

Baron
Baron's picture

Cool,   Send a PM next week then. 

mtnmike
mtnmike's picture

Fellas,

All this talk about snapback, capstans, etc. has gotten the old memory churning.  In my college days, I worked one summer for Spreckles Sugar in central CA, loading sugar beets in railcars. As we loaded the beets via a conveyor, we'd advance the cars by means of a hefty cable and capstan winch.  The old foreman (haha, probably younger than I am now!) put the fear of the breaking cable into us by telling of a guy he'd known in his youth who was standing near the cable when it snapped, and "took his leg off, like a hot knife through butter!" He made us keep 20 feet from it.  Because of that graphic picture, I never lost a leg-- but I have learned since then that you can effectively "tame" the snapback, by simply hanging something like a heavy tarp or blanket, or even a coat, about midway along the length of the pull; in the event of a break, somehow the kinetic energy (or whatever) is spent on the blanket, and that sucker doesn't go whipping around looking for someone to maim. Takes an extra couple moments, but worth your safety.

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I think the midway thing may be an idea; not sure I want to test it, but I will probably give it a try. Cheap to try, at least.

Baron
Baron's picture

Dang it all MtnMike.......there you are. I looked and looked for your info but couldn't find it and neither could I remember your name. In the meantime I went to Lafayette, Sacramento, Merced, Tracy, Visalia and dozens of other places but I couldnt your name so couldnt visit ya. 

I aggree with your logic and its mostly correct with wire rope. With yesterdays stretchy nylon ropes it was really bad but it wasn't the rope that kills but rather the clevis or hook or choker that you have to worry about when they let loose and come flying at you.

With todays synthetic winch line there are choices with virtually no elasticity in them and so it follow that snapback is almost a non issue if the correct line is used. 

has anyone seen chokers in sythetic rope?

mtnmike
mtnmike's picture

Shoot, Baron.... Sorry I missed you when you were "out West."  Sounds like you made the rounds. I'm in the foothills above Fresno, so you were definitely in the neighborhood. Let me know next time you're out here.

I really like the discussion on these synthetic lines. Sounds like the only way to go nowadays. In my stint as a sailor, one duty as the ship's carpenter (never quite understood why) was to operate the anchor winch anytine the ship was entering or leaving port. It was an older ship (built 1949), and so this included a massive capstan attached to the massive anchor winch. I always marveled at the ease of control one has with just a few turns on the capstan-- even with a 2- or 3-inch hawser line being used to pull the ship sideways into the berth and tie up.  I will definitely look into a capstan winch/ synthetic line for moving logs around in the woods.  Though as I mentioned in a post awhile back, I am presently getting plenty of the bazillion bug-kill pines from our Sierra Nevada delivered right to my mill, for free!  However, I know this can't last forever...

Baron
Baron's picture

Yeah mntmike it won't last forever but then there will be conifer adelgid, then after that there will be Oak moth,then there will be Elm comakazi ant. Get the picture? That is what we call "nature" and it is your friend. There is always something. 

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

Well, in June I broke the drive-coupler on the 75 hp Massey. So I used my little 28hp to drag all those huge bash up in smaller sections. Not small enough cause now it's a front wheel drive only. The day before surgery , I spent eight hours backfilling the foundation on my son's house. The ground was frozen and rain all day. I'll bet I put thirty miles on those bald front tires and only a mile on the rear. Got it done before hard freeze.

Pages