You are here

14 posts / 0 new
Last post
Shole
Shole's picture
Quad and logging arch

Anyone using a quad to pull the logging arch?  I am growing weary of fighting with my 1952 Farmall Super A and am considering a quad / arch combination.  I don't do as much logging as I used to so the reduction in production wouldn't be an issue.

 

My question is; how big do I need to go?  I know "bigger is better", but the wallet is only so deep.

 

Scotty

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Get equipment that is designed for the job.  A 4x4 quad should have shaft drive, disk brakes, receiver hitch, reverse gear, and be liquid cooled (since you'll be doing serious pulling at speeds too low for air cooling to do its job.  No smaller than 400 cc.  You can get the benefit of a bigger quad with liquid filled tires and  a good winch, but that will also set you back some serious cash.  You can also get tire chains for quads.  Just don't take any steep downhill or side slopes.  I'd highly recommend a roll bar, if possible.

Have you thought about a smaller tractor?  I've been using an 8N Ford to get logs to my sawmill for quite a while and very pleased with its capability.  It is a lot cheaper than a quad, more stable, and designed for pulling.  

Shole
Shole's picture

Oakie:  I have been running a 1952 Farmall Super A for over 20 years; its been great.  However, it is wearing out and needing more and more repairs as it ages.  Smaller tractors around here are not cheap and are usually very worn out.  Anything with a loader, regardless of age or quality is very expensive - in excess of $4000.  I don't log as much as I used to.  I figured I would explore the option of a quad as it would be a multi-use vehicle (its not much fun bombing around the trails on a tractor.....).

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Guess that comes from being in a different part of the country.  Around here, you can still buy a working 8N Ford for $1,500, but they often need some TLC.  You're right about the quad being more fun, though.  A log arch makes a huge difference in the size of the log you can handle.  The better you can balance the log (just as long as it isn't nose heavy), the bigger log you can pull.  Again, be careful on the hills.  I've pulled logs with a log arch and a friend's 400 cc Bombardier on level ground, and it did  all right.

Dewchie
Dewchie's picture

Here are a few pics of my Suzuki 400. I used it at first before I bought a tractor and was amazed. I am very careful when going up and down inclines but it worked great on this big log even through some muddy areas and small creeks.
Safety is key and I admit I did use it NOT according to the manual but that is what was needed at times. Mine is not liquid cooled, however I only pulled 8-12'6 logs around 16" diameter average. One though was 24".



24" Hemlock



Log arch at work

Shole
Shole's picture

Thanks for the comments. The tractor vs quad debate is a tough one if you can only afford one of the two. If I replaced my tractor it would have to be with something with a loader to feed the mill easier. If I go with a quad I would want an arch or skidding cone and a forwarding trailer like Norwood used to sell.

Decisions, decisions, decisions........

logbuilder
logbuilder's picture

Shole

I don't know if I'm a little late in anwsering your question but here it goes, I have a  yamaha kodack 450 quad and I haul all kind of logs, poplar,spruce and jack pine and the occational red pine.I owen two log arches a small one for the front behind the quad and a second bigger one for lifting the butt end so they don't get dirty hauling .

Now I put a ball hitch on the small one to pull the bigger one when getting big logs .Now with a quad I can get into tighter places then a tractor or truck and put a smaler foot print in the forest.I wouldn't have any other way.

I hope this helps you.

maybe this year I'll take some pics of it in action.

Dewchie
Dewchie's picture

Well I have to say the tractor if you can is a must cause it had been a great help getting logs from where I know my log arch and quad can not retrieve them. Good luck!

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

One thing to consider is a side by side; I was lucky enough to get a great price on a Polaris Ranger 6X (2002 model), and although I have had it stuck a time or two, it is a brute for getting places.
When I check current value for retail (http://www.nadaguides.com/Motorcycles/2002/Polaris/RANGER-6X6-499cc/Values), it comes in around $3000.
NOTE: Brakes are wet disk, and not the greatest; don't start down a hill if you don't want to reach the bottom.

kcquick
kcquick's picture

tractors are designed to pull. Quads are designed for fun first and work second. I would suggest a tractor with some sort of winch I am in south western NY we have large steep hills, a quad would be very dangerous to pull logs. In my opinion a tractor on the 35-50 hp range with chains and ROPS is a necessity unless you are fortunate enough to have a skidder on hand but my budget is limited to a tractor with a loader I just purchased a JD2010 with loader for under 4000 but I had to shop around a lot.

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

The JD2010 is a fine tractor if it's anything like the next number up. Working as a farm laborer for a couple of years, I used my employer's JD2020 (I think it was) to do just about everything from crop work, to pulling, to brush-hogging. While not much horsepower by today's standards, it seemed capable of anything. Kind of big though, hope your woods aren't too thick.

kcquick
kcquick's picture

I looked on eBay and found several 8n/9n fords for under 2000 they are a pretty good tractor for the avg homeowner and do a fine job skidding

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

kcquick, You're right about the 8N Fords. "Old Henry" and I have pulled a lot of logs out of the woods. Very stable tractor and with a PTO winch can pull pretty impressive logs. Once up to the tractor, the log arch helps a lot, and I can pull logs in 2nd gear that I couldn't budge by simply dragging them. If you can find one with a Sherman step-down transmission, you've struck gold! Front end loader is handy, but can only lift about 600 pounds. Down side is no power steering, which makes maneuvering tough, especially with a load in the front end loader. Don't worry too much about the engine. They're cheap and easy to replace. It is a pretty good match for a portable sawmill.

J R in Missouri
J R in Missouri's picture

My son and I have a 901 Wide Row Cropper Ford. We made a arch from the rear frame of a compact car using stub axles and tire and wheels, but it is a litte narrow for most of our oak timber. We usualy use the boom and chain with a short hitch (half of boom) to lift one end of log and drag them to the landing. The high setting 901 makes for nice to drive over stumps and rocks. We make sure the cross brace of boom lift is blocking the PTO shaft. If one gets the log end too high it will become a ram to pound on the end of PTO shaft. We have a chain hook made from a section or rod from an electric fence to pull the chain under log. Use a logger chain hitch and off we go. A chain log hitch is to wrap the hook end around chain then back on itself to from a lassoo or noose. It pulls chain tight