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Baron
Baron's picture

Those mushrooms look tasty. 

DaveM
DaveM's picture

So I have got the wood stove in the steel building & have kept a fire fairly steady for about a month now.  The humidity in the building has dropped from the high 70s to the high 40s now.  When I first started burning the stove, there was a cloud of moisture in the building for 2 days. It was actually foggy.  I had to keep opening the doors & windows to exchange the air.  Probably from all the moisture in all the wood I stacked in there. The wood I air dried for about 6 months outside was @ 20 average sampling per my moisture meter.  It is down to 14 average now.  Some slightly higher, some slightly lower.  Looks like the idea has some merit.  Not to mention it's so much nicer working in the shop now. 

DaveM
DaveM's picture

By the way......where is the Fall - Winter issue of Norwood News ?

bcloutier
bcloutier's picture

Hey fellow sawyers, I am noticing that my well stickered pine boards and beams that were sawn in the last month are developing blue stain, not all but some. It's all undercover in the barn with lots of ventilation. This has been one rainy month of June, every other day it seems. Is this the contributing factor or is it the fungus I have been reading about. Any solutions other than running a fan on the stack. Will bleaching the boards help? Thanks for any comments or help you may have.

smithbr
smithbr's picture

Were they fresh logs when sawn, or had they been down for a while?  My experience is, if you saw them fresh, no problem.  If they sit around in log form, it's a race against both the blue stain and the pine sawyer grubs.  Probably depends on the weather at that point, the bugs are more active in the sun, but I expect the fungus that causes the blue stain is more active in the wet.  Pine and spruce are now on my "saw immediately, or don't accept the log" list - I'm sawing 30-odd spruce poles that have been in the yard for almost a year, and they're a mess due to grubs.  Same with the single pine log from the same cutting, grubs and blue stain as well.  It'll be okay for the back wall of the shed, though.  My guess is, if the fungus is already in the bark when you saw, the blade itself will spread the fungus across the surface.  Not sure what would help then, maybe pine sol as a disinfectant?  Just speculation.

If you sawed fresh logs and you've got blue stain, then it's got to be storage, but I can't suggest what you might do better.

 

bcloutier
bcloutier's picture

smithbr, thanks for your comments. Truly appreciate any advice. I sawed the logs in late April and the pitch was just pissin' out of them so I waited until it hardened a bit, stored them up off the ground on skids for about a month, and started sawing them in late May. I didn't go right at but but sawed a couple mornings a week through the end of  May and all of June. Up until last week, I hadn't noticed any discoloration in the pile which was stickered and in my barn. I thought there was enough ventilation, but didn't have a fan going. We had a ton of rain that week and all of a sudden the mildew came to life in about 3 days time. I have pulled the stack apart now into four stacks, re-stickered and sprayed every board and beam with a bleach mixture. It is helping lighten the stain and killing the mold spores. It'll be OK for my personal use, and I plan on putting a solid color stain over it anyway, so it'll be fine. Just wasn't happy with it 'cause the boards were real nice, some clear stuff, not all, but they looked good for my 1st sawing experience. Didn't have any pine sawyer grubs yet, but I see the adults flying around now. They'll be in the slab pile I bet. As they say, you learn from your mistakes, at least you should! I have...won't do that again. I 'll use fans from now on and sticker better and space better in the stack. I may not do pine in the rainy humid weather again either...save it for fall and winter, which is when I do the firewood, but will squeeze it in somewhere. Thanks again and happy sawing!

smithbr
smithbr's picture

I should have mentioned, the sawyer grubs enter through the bark - so once sawn, make sure you peel all waney edges!  If you do that, you shouldn't see grubs in your planks - but the slabwood will be overrun with them.  I made the mistake of taking some of that slabwood into the house three winters ago for starting wood.  Crunch, crunch, crunch began as soon as the wood thawed. 

bcloutier
bcloutier's picture

Yup, my wife and I were talking about that last night...crunch, crunch of the grubs. We brought some pine into the cellar, the winter before last to split down for kindling. I have been seeing the adults flying all around recently, and I hate it when they land on me, scares the crap outta me with their long antennae!

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Some blue stained pine is sold for twice as much under the name "denim pine".  No loss in strength, as far as I know.  Around here, it is powder post beetles.  They chew their way out leaving little piles of sawdust behind.  I'm going to start spraying boards with a borax solution.  Kiln should be set up by the end of July.

bcloutier
bcloutier's picture

Post Oakie, I read about the "blue denim" pine online and the premium price it can bring! Hot damn! I could make some on purpose if I had that market share, but I like my pine on the lighter and clean side. I just finished spaying all the boards both sides and edges with 1:8 ratio Bleach/Sodium Hydroxide solution. It will kill the spores and does lighten it up quite a bit. Happy so far with the results...3 days work but if it works, great! Your kiln will be a nice addition and problem solver, too. Don't know if I'd get into a kiln or not, but best of luck with yours.smiley

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