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toxedo_2000
toxedo_2000's picture
Timber tool

I was looking at that tool on the web site, and i called for a price. 395 $ plus taxes and shipping. Is that a little bit expensive or is it me who is to poor ?
Toxedo

Robert in W. Mi.
Robert in W. Mi.'s picture

I have the \"Timber Tool\", and use it quite a bit...

Yes it's expensive, but it is VERY well made, and it looks like it will last me the rest of my life... Good tools are never cheap...

Robert

toxedo_2000
toxedo_2000's picture

I finally manage to make one. OH, I wont say it is as nice and perfect as the Norwood Timbertool, but I tried it and it worked perfectly. It is heavier than the Norwood one, but it does the same thing very nicely. I would not try it on a 30 inches tree, but for most of my needs, it is OK. For the bigger trees, I'll continue to use the tractor and a very long chain.

To buit it, I used a bumper jack and a 3 inches pipe. The good thing is, I always bring that jack with me anyways, so if I can use it for another job... very good !
If one day I have the chance to put my hand on a timber tool from Norwood, I will for sure buy it. But for now, in this recession time...
Here it is before I painted it

Bill
Bill's picture

Very inventive toxedo.

Bill

Treebucker
Treebucker's picture

8)

I was thinking about one of those adjustable support post like you see holding up the support beams in basements as a foundation to start with.

toxedo_2000
toxedo_2000's picture

Treebucker wrote:
8)

I was thinking about one of those adjustable support post like you see holding up the support beams in basements as a foundation to start with.

Not a bad idea. But unscrewing could be to long to do the job. When its is time to elongate the gizmo, it has to be a fast action.
The kind of jack i use permit to be fast enough.

Toxedo

mo
mo's picture

Will either version (homemade or Norwod) really persuade a tree to go opposite the way it leans? I have a 16 inch maple near the house, wit a ver slight lean towards t he open sunlight. I was planning to rope it high and get a good pull, but some extra insurance would make me feel better. I have a high lift jack , some pipe and a welder, so input is appreciated.

toxedo_2000
toxedo_2000's picture

mo wrote:
Will either version (homemade or Norwod) really persuade a tree to go opposite the way it leans? I have a 16 inch maple near the house, wit a ver slight lean towards t he open sunlight. I was planning to rope it high and get a good pull, but some extra insurance would make me feel better. I have a high lift jack , some pipe and a welder, so input is appreciated.

Mo
If it is to dangerous for the tree to fall on a valuable property, I would say use your extra insurance, use a long rope.
If the tree is very high, wait for the favorable wind too.

No chance to take.

Tox

rranapa
rranapa's picture

Mo,
Toxedo_2000 is absoultely correct. While he was answering I started to do some quick calculations for you. With lots and lots of asumptions I figure you will get about 25 times more moment on the tree with a rope than a jack. I assumed a couple thousand pounds of pull on a rope 20' off the ground; with the jack and rope at 60 and 30 degree angles. The rope does require a second person to help. I'm in the process of taking down a 90' spruce and will use a 200' double braid nylon line to make sure the tree falls appropriately. There are a lot of double braid nylons on Ebay. There is a 5/8 arborist line (305 ft long) for sale that has a reported tensile strength of 17000 lbs. A bit of overkill for your tree; but it makes my old heart beat a bit faster. Good Luck.

Blackbeered
Blackbeered's picture

That's worked for me for 40 years ... just this past Summer, I felled a 130-ft oak [44" diameter base and 15 feet from the house].

Step 1: toss a leader over a high branch [bow and arrow or a weighted bag works great]; mine was ~ 30' off the ground;

Step 2: if needed, work with successively larger leaders until you have the hauling rope [I use a 200" long, double-braid, 14K-lb tensile] in position; make a bowline knot and pass the bitter end thru;

Step 3: haul the bitter end until the noose is cinched;

Step 4: attach a snatch block at the base of a tree in the direction of fall; 

Step 5: attach the bitter end to the tractor hitch and pre-load haul at 60-90 degrees from the direction of the fall;

Step 6: make you cuts.

 

mo
mo's picture

I definitely planned for the rope, understand moment calculations from school a long time ago. I was looking for some additional push from another person on the bottom using something like this. I was curious how well the tool really worked on a tree this size. The biggest advantage I would see is preventing the saw pinch as you neared the end of the cut so the rope would actually pull it over.

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

One thing to think about is the tree will fall toward the weight. To assist, if there are any large branches on the side toward the house, take them off first (use a line from higher up the tree, maybe with a turnbuckle so the branch doesn't hit the house).

If you can get the mass of the tree on the side that is clear, then you will need less leverage pulling it.

NOTE: If all the branches are on one side, it may try to twist; make certain the hinge is good. 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Norwood's tool looks like it could come in handy, but it is pretty amazing what you can do with plastic wedges and directional felling techniques.  I never fell trees without at least three wedges and a single bit axe nearby.  At very least, it will lift the tree off of a pinched saw.  This video is pretty much the way I do it.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZR7rw4HVVY .  Be careful out there!

Bill
Bill's picture

Six year old thread, that tool might be fine for some one who drives to their trees but I wouldn't want to pack it around the bush. 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Yeah, you're right it was an old thread. Not sure why it showed up as 'unread' for me. 

jfk2man
jfk2man's picture

I got one with my "sawmill" package. It has a tendancy to bury the 'foot' in the soft forest floor. I think, for what it is, it works well. Really not long enough and like mentioned, heavy! I do use it for an extra hand lifting roofs of sheds, putting tension on beams etc. Very useful for pushing 'something' or lifting.Lots of uses!  I'm glad one came with my set up.

elkmtnman
elkmtnman's picture

I bought my TimberTool about 10 years ago and use it for almost every tree I fell. Recently I have had to lift the paul to collapse the tool, even though it says NEVER do that. What is the solution other than frequent oiling?

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I dunno, maybe penetrating oil, but less often than frequent?

 

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