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blderman
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LM29 vs EZ-Boardwalk Jr vs Linn Lumber 190A

Hey All,

I am getting ready to purchase a sawmill in the next few days and have it narrowed down to the three mills listed in the subject line.  Since this is a Norwood forum I was hoping you guys could give me some input on why I should choose the LM29 over the other two.  At the moment I am leaning towards the Linn 190A as I live in Oregon and they are offering $200 off plus free delivery right now.  I looked at an older Linn mill last night and really like it except for the location of the height adjustment handle.  It seemed odd to me to place it so high when the work you are doing is all below waist level.  I will mainly be using this for hobby milling but I am also a General Contractor and plan on using it to mill my own mantles and custom trim work for the houses I build.    Thanks in advance for any help! 

 

r.garrison1
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I considered the Linn models, but I noticed the tracks were pretty slim relative to the Norwood models. They depend on having the support underneath, especially if you are running logs of any size. Consider that a 24" diameter log that is 12' long is probably 2000 to 3500 pounds, depending on moisture and species.

Another thing I noticed was the spring loading on the log clamp looks good, but if there is any instability in the log (deep bark, like cedar, or uneven shape), you can't crank it down tighter. 

Finally, I don't believe the Linn models have an underlug wheel. The unit sits on the track. If something causes strain, can it lift off a little, making a rise in the cut? I'm not sure.

 

That said, if you have a fixed location or a sturdy trailer you are mounting it on, that may offset #1 above. It may be possible to make your own clamp system (I did for my LM29, so that's not an insurmountable challenge).

Finally, it may have an underlug or some other means of keeping the sawhead on the track.

 

The advantage the Linn models have is that you can buy parts, and build your own to whatever meets your requirements. 

 

Where in Oregon do you live? I have an LM29 in Tigard right now, and summers I spend a bit of time with it in the Wallowas.

blderman
blderman's picture

Thank you for the info. I didn't realize the Linn tracks we're thin. It's really hard to tell in the pics and there isn't a lot of info on their website. I live in Baker City, was just in Portland last week, darn.

blderman
blderman's picture

Thank you for the info. I didn't realize the Linn tracks we're thin. It's really hard to tell in the pics and there isn't a lot of info on their website. I live in Baker City, was just in Portland last week, darn.

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

I only made a guess, but they look like square tube. Probably pretty sturdy, if supported in enough places, but I like that I have a vertical edge.

One other thing I just thought of; how hard is it to add cross bunks to the other models? With the LM29, you can bolt them on closer than typical.. I have some about 2' from each other, some span a bit over 3'. With cedar and some other woods, depending on grain and such, there can be some sag, especially at the ends.

I haven't made any bunks out of metal yet, but I have two wood ones. I plan on replacing one with metal, and making another. I guess i could buy one from Norwood, but that takes the fun out of it.

 

If you ever get over by Joseph in the summer, give a holler. I'm about 10 miles out of town (when I am back there).

blderman
blderman's picture

Well I ended up placing an order for an EZ Jr. I really like the LM29 but I couldn't justify the extra cost right now. I ordered the EZ with the trailer package, log turner, 5ft extension and electric start. I figure if I end up enjoying milling and want to venture off into larger projects I will sell the EZ and buy an HD36 with hydraulics.

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Enjoy sawing!

Now that you have a sawmill, you will also  be needing blades. I suggest trying different brands, to see which suit you and your mill.

blderman
blderman's picture

That's my plan.  The Timberwolf blades that come with it are pretty expensive so I plan on trying Cook blades and Kasco. 

 

 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Resharpening is quite a savings, so when the blade starts getting dull, change it. It will last through more resharpenings.

blderman
blderman's picture

Thanks, to start I figure I will send them out to be resharpened.  If I end up sticking with this milling hobby then I will probably invest in an automatic sharpener.  Just got a 13ft long x 36" diameter black walnut trunk tonight.  Can't wait to mill that thing up once I have had some practice! 

 

 

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

How often do you get to the Portland area? There is a Woodmizer shop out toward Troutdale that sharpens them for me. I run them over there every couple months.

For the cost of sharpening, it doesn't work out for me to buy a sharpener, since I don't pay any shipping charges when I drop them by.

blderman
blderman's picture

Once a year at the most.  Ever since I moved from there to Baker City I try really hard to not go back! :)  We have a local guy that does sharpener here so I am going to check with him too.