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Yukon_larry
Yukon_larry's picture
New lm29

I pulled the trigger and purchased the lm29 back about 10 days ago. I also had them mail me a set of instructions which I have received, to read over and hopefully gain a a bit of knowledge before it arrives. Thanks Norwood! The weather up here in the yukon is turning progressively colder with each day and needless to say when the sawmill arrives it's bound to be-30. So I'm wondering what I can do to make sure I can operate the thing in the cold (you can't expect me to wait till April) or is operating in the cold incredibly hard on the components? I've read a bit on these forums about a few hardships along the road while building this thing. What are a couple of the most important things to keep in mind while assembling? Thanks! 

Bill
Bill's picture

Just take you time and follow the instructions Larry you may have to read some of them over a few times to absorb the terminalogy. I ran my mill nearly ever day the first winter but it was only - 5 to -20 most days in the spring I found out wood that isn't frozen sawed much easier surprise. Congrats on your new mill looking forward to hear about the fun your having.

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

If your LM29 is low to the ground, the engine will help keep you warm while you saw.  Use windshield washer fluid instead of water for blade lube.  Warm up the engine before sawing  --  then, if you can stand the weather, the saw can too.  Frozen logs saw differently than fresh green ones  --   just consider them hardwood and pay close attention to what they tell you.  [From Suffolk Machinery:  your band teeth may need a smaller hook angle (8 degrees); and if sawdust freezes in the cut and packs on the boards, a narrower tooth set may help (try .017", but no lower than .015").  Blades should only be run about half as long as normal (no more than 1 1/2 hr) when cutting frozen logs.]

wayne busse
wayne busse's picture

We had more problems getting diesel tractors started in subzero temps last winter. The 23 vanguard started right up each morning and after the first log we were

taking off layers of clothing. We also piled our logs in a tight pile and covered them with tarps before a foot of snow fell . Even after two nights at 10 below  the logs under the snow covered tarps were not frozen. If you're further north where temps stay below freezing for weeks ,it probably won't help. Ed is spot on - if you can take the cold ,you can saw all winter. I had a cherry tree that was on the ground for two years that was too frozen to saw. The blade jumped off the band wheels mid cut and I almost put out and eye from ice chips when I used an axe to extract the blade. After a couple days above freezing temps , it sawed okay.

Welcome to the forum and enjoy playing with you giant erector set. A battery powered impact driver will speed up the process without overtightening the nuts.

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

Yukon Larry

welcome to the form, do you have a shop you can get into while you assemble the mill? the biggest issue I had was not jumping ahead of myself. Work your way through it page by page box by box, it all comes together really well. There are a few places I was scratching my head and had to look ahead for a picture or 2. There are 2 pieces of key stock that come with the mill. One comes in the box your motor is in and one comes in a Norwood box. Use the one from NORWOOD it is the one that fits correctly. I lived in the North for 5 years (Fort Smith NWT) I don't think you will have issues with the cold. like they said use windshield washer fluid, the cheap stuff or as cheap as the North gets. I know when it gets minas 40c or so metal gets brittle, the blades might be something to watch for a bit until you see what they do. I have sawed at minas 20c but never as cold as you are going to see. I find the frozen softwood saws the same as not frozen. Have fun

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Larry, welcome to the forum!  Not much to add, other than take your time in assembling the sawmill, and plan on a bit of a learning curve when you first start.  The biggest issue I had was getting the tracking right.  As soon as I revved up the engine, the blade came off before it even touched the wood!  Turn the band wheels by had a few revolutions to make sure the blade is riding where it should before you put on the shields and start up the engine.  You may need to keep an eye on blade tension, as it will expand somewhat as it warms up as it cuts.  As for the engine, battery, and keeping moisture out of the cables & moving parts, you probably already know about that from maintaining your other equipment.  Good luck, & let us know how you progress.

Yukon_larry
Yukon_larry's picture

Thanks for the advice! It's all assembled, I had a few troubles with doing the final adjustments on the blade distance from the bunk. I was always 1/32 out. I think I have it now. Do you have to consistently measure this distance? Or just after you build? I'm building my own trailer frame for it because I have lots of metal an axle and a few jack stands. Do I have to re measure the blade to bunk distance and frig around with that again? How much can I move the frame around without it going out of "true cut"? I understand that you level it after you move it. But it shouldn't go out of "true" after the frames bolted together should it? 

Bill
Bill's picture

Once the blade  parallel to the bunk it should stay there maybe after a few mons. a cable may stretch a bit. If it's out you'll soon see it as soon as your stack some lumber. 

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Best way to tell if the blade is out of parallel is to keep an eye on the boards as you cut them.  You'll notice this after you have turned a squared cant, because the first board you cut will be tapered side to side, but make sure that the cant is sitting square and flat on the crossbunks before making an adjustment.  To give you an idea of how much adjustment, if there is 1/8" difference in thickness on the edges of an 8" wide cant, you would need to raise the low side (or lower the high side) 1/4" (but measure the blade height on both ends, just to be sure).  Then, of course, you need to re-calibrate the scale.  Bill is right about the cable stretching.  After the first couple thousand board feet, I only adjusted it a couple of times in the last four years, but keeping an eye on the board for taper whenever you turn the log is just part of good sawmilling.

Yukon_larry
Yukon_larry's picture

Thanks guys. I still haven't cut a board with it. Which is really a shame with the beautiful weather we are having.+4Csmiley. Im building a trailer for my mill using torsion axles instead of leaf springs. I'm hoping it'll help keep my mill closer to the ground. My questions are: should I buy jack stands for levelling feet or make them like the lm29 trailer package and save a buck. bill MacLellan you might have some insight. Are the slider style levelling feet a pain? And is the Norwood hitch assembly fairly stout? What would you guys change if anything? I'm about $350 in with materials with just the levelling feet to tackle yet. Thanks! 

Bill MacLellan
Bill MacLellan's picture

Larry the legs on the LM29 are good but I would like to have crank down legs just for the ease of leveling. Right now I have to drive onto some boards to level from side to side. Once I have that done then I drop the front down as far as the crank down leg will let me and then drop the back legs and then crank the front back up. That places a lot of weight on the legs so things don't move. So if you can swing some cheap crank down legs that's the way to go. As for the hitch it seems good and strong and the fact it removes is a good thing, easier on the shins.

RyanC
RyanC's picture

Hello Folks,

 

I recently purchased a new LM29 thanks to reading your feedback and information on the forum. You guys are full of great information.

 

Im looking forward to get sawing, we are located in Sparta Ontario Canada and after a long winter of felling trees its warming up and almost time to let the dust fly.

 

Cheers!

r.garrison1
r.garrison1's picture

Welcome to the forum?

What are you going to cut with your new toy sawmill? Do you have your own woodlot, or will you be getting logs from somewhere else?

RyanC
RyanC's picture

Thanks R.Garrison

 

My wife and I recently moved on to a 45 acre wood lot. It is a Carolinian forest made up of mostly hardwoods; there is primarily Ash, Maple, Oak, and poplar with Beech, Hickory and a little Cherry and Walnut scattered throughout.

 

I purchased the sawmill in hopes to use the "endless" ash plagued by emeralnd beetles and the poplar that is nearing the end of its lifecycle to build all the projects she can dream up like garden sheds, green house, chicken coops, kiln, cabin, on and on. We also build furniture and decor so I am hoping to use some of the nicer woods for these types of projects.

 

Theres a lot of learning ahead with the mill but thats what makes life exciting

 

Cheers!

Bill
Bill's picture

Your sure going to have a variety of nice woods to work with Ryan. Looking forward to seeing your projects.

RyanC
RyanC's picture

Im looking forward to diving in Bill,

 

Im sure this has been covered before so forgive my ignorance. What hook and pitch blades are generally recommended for dead standing hardwood like ash, im sure it cant be easy on the blades i know theres a noticable difference when using the chainsaw

 

 

Also, do people typically have any issues with using ash right off the mill for structures like sheds? Ive seen many cabins up north built using ash that have been there for 30+ years and still looking great.

 

Thanks again for all the help!

Bill
Bill's picture

Most every shed I build the majorty of the lumber is straight off the mill. I've only sawen 1 ash amd the large dead dry limb on it was like cutting iron I don't know about the pitch but a few blades with a 6 degree hook would be good , even bi metal blades . Some others may have better ideas.

RW Moore
RW Moore's picture

Ryan,

I also have a lot of standing white ash.  The emerald ash borer has decimated in eastern Ontario.  As most of my saw logs have no branches the material cuts very clean.  White ash has a fairly low moisture content and I have measured moisture of 22 to 25 % right off the mill.  I have used 1-1/4" x 7/8" 10 degree and 7 degree blades and did not notice any difference.  The blades seem to hold up well and the blades usually hold up better than sawing white pine or eastern white cedar.  I have approx 40 ash logs qued for sawing once the snow is gone and the ground dries up.  I find white ash easy to work with, it finishes well and the open grain with a finished appearance similar to red oak.

Bob 

RyanC
RyanC's picture

That’s great. Thank you both Bob and Bill for the advise it’s all a great help starting out   

I too have a stack I’m waiting to attack but the weather seems to have a different idea 

 

all the best!