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papow22
papow22's picture
useful sawmill mods is there any?

I  was wondering if there is useful sawmill mods that fit the nowoods mill or the csm.Cause I went looking around and found one started on The forestry forum  and i saw alot of ideas that work for other mills but only couple on norwoods give or take.Maybe we don/t need mods on our mills for Norwoods Built the best wink.I know my LM 2000 don't need any but after seeing some well I'm going to use one for sure.No offence intended to no one about the sawmill modifcaions.I know it's hard modify the best cheeky

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

I imagine one of the most common modifications to the LM2000 is to add an extra shut-off valve in the water line so you're not lubing the blade when the engine is idling, which also allows the flow adjustment to remain unchanged. I went further and added a separate flow control valve in-line. I put a foam pad on the operator's push bar and I rigged up a throttle lever lock to hold the engine at top speed on the rare occasion when I find that necessary. On my 15HP Kohler, I put a fuel filter in line and added a short pipe to the oil drain hole so oil wouldn't dribble down the engine mount when changing oil. And I put a urethane belt on the idler band wheel.

papow22
papow22's picture

Thank for the idea on the oil drain pipe,But urethane belt not familiar with that.where does a person get one like that?.But  I did see one person put a short niple and elbow and a short nipple with a exhaust flapper on top.To me that is added weight for I'm putting a piece exhaust pipe with a bend up to the exhaust flapper to keep the rain out.But that person said it keeps fumes out of a person's face.Also I like the extra flow valve control.yes

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Urethane belts fit tighter and last longer than standard v-belts. I got mine from Suffolk Machinery Corp., the people who sell Timberwolf blades. The flow control valve came very cheaply from Harbor Freight. I haven't had a problem with exhaust fumes on the Kohler; sawdust in my eyes is another thing though. One thing I do in the summer is stuff a cork in the exhaust pipe when I'm not using the mill for awhile to keep wasps out. Don't know if that's necessary, but I once had a lawnmower engine ruined by mud daubers.

papow22
papow22's picture

laugh   That bit about mud daubers that was something that I've never heard of before.It's agood one,The little demons are PAIN lol I know when doing fencing you find them before you know it.Weli the belts are something i have to look into,But Harbor Frieght that we don't have here Alberta Canada.But I think Princess Auto will carry them flow control valves.

swampbuggy
swampbuggy's picture

I have found that I don't like the way the sawdust flied all over the place on my MX34 so....

 

Here is the way my log deck looks all cleaned up

 

And here it is after one board is cut with the original configuration

 

So I go to the hardware store and buy 4 pieces of pre-bend flashing $.35 cents a piece. Tape them together with some duct tape.

 

Install it on the mill. Basically just stuck on it.

 

Milled another board

and the log deck stays clean, sawdust flying around is minimized, and it is easier to pick up at the end of the day because its all in one pile. One thing though, I have to watch how close to the output holes it is because it can add some sawdust to the left track area.

Dan

 

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Good idea. I've been meaning to do something along those lines on my mill, but haven't quite got it thought out yet. If anyone has made a down-directed sawdust chute on a LM2000, I'd sure like to see a picture. By the way, what kind of tree or plant is that in the background of the last picture?

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Here's an answer to my own question regarding a down-directed sawdust chute.  Use the Search function, type in "saw dust chute".  When you see the list, select "couple of issues. . ."  There it is: JP's plan for the chute, and a picture.  Duh, remind me to always search first.  Thanks to JP.  (Next day:  I'm sorry I posted this.  That post has disappeared.  There's still a picture at "sawdust chute revisited").

swampbuggy
swampbuggy's picture

Eddie, I think what you are looking at is a fallen cabbage palm. Its heading to the burn pile. Dan

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

A few ideas... I've been kicking around building a self-loading log deck for the MX34, using hydraulics on my log splitter.  I'd also like to put a brake on the carriage so the wind doesn't blow it down the track when I'm offbearing or turning logs (right now, I just clamp a vice grip onto the track, but I'm always misplacing it).  Has anyone fitted a heavy duty canister-type air filter to their engine?

citrafarm
citrafarm's picture

Post Oakie, reference to carriage break. Here is was the way I did it, I take a 48" bungy cord and hook it to the top of the carriage, when to get to the end I just pull it down and hook it to saw bunk bed where ever it will keep tension. When done just hook that end back up on the carriage out of the way. It is cheap and the same cord has been on there for years.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Citrafarm, Thanks!  I'll give it a try.  This may be the best thread on the forum!

papow22
papow22's picture

cool  Now the ideas coming in and also the beautiful pictures.I seen a down chute that was made from what looked like hard plastic that can be bent by hand and pop rivited to the exit chute of lm2000.I have to go and find it some where and see if I can put it here to help out.wink Maybe Post Oakie knows.Well also I got to get the photo downloading down pat to show some ideas that I also seen.Super nice ideas,cool ideas also.

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

I don't know of any hard plastic that can be bent by hand, though some could be heat formed.  The aluminum flashing that Swampbuggy used is a good material.  The sharp 90o bend might clog up the chute somewhat, though.  A radius curve in the metal or an adjustable sheet metal elbow might work.  Something to work on this weekend.

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Oh, I remember another modification to my LM2000. But in this case, the saw made it. A lot of people take out the screen in the dust chute opening. A broken blade took mine out as it flew through the opening. It wasn't really flying, but it hit it with enough force to ruin the screen. I haven't missed it. And I've modified my log posts too by accidentally trying to cut them off a few times. I suspect you've done that, and if you haven't, you will (addressed to no one in particular).

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

I've modified a few band saw blades that way, too, but so far it hasn't helped them any.

I put an extra washer under the first bolt that holds the track onto the frame to make a slight bump.  This keeps the carriage from rolling forward while I'm loading or turning a log.

 

Not a modification, really, but it gets the log level.  One of these days I'll get a real set of toe boards.

logbuilder
logbuilder's picture

I made three sets of rolling toe boards using a sissorjack for lifting the top of the log. Use to have pics of it but photo bucket lost them but here is a couple pics of my drawings.

eddiemac
eddiemac's picture

Oakie, that's using your head (raised bolt). Sometimes the simplest ideas are the best. As your bearings get old, the mill may not move with the breeze as much. You could soak them in salt water now to hasten the process. I use the same toe board method to raise the really big logs (with a little two-ton hydraulic jack). I have the old manual toe board system, which I like, but it breaks the connecting bolt and bends things if I try to lift too much weight.

Dewchie
Dewchie's picture

If I need to move my log forward or backword after I put it on the mill I use a 2x4 and lever up one end and stick a 2" pipe under the log and do the same to the other end. Then I can easily push it where I need it . Then I remove the pipes. ( galvanized fence pipe works great)

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

I can see the pipe trick working.  I've had to lever logs in place with my cant hook.  I managed bend the track pretty good doing it once, but was able to take it off the mill and straighten it out.

Dewchie
Dewchie's picture

I done this with a 24" diameter log 12'6" long it was not to hard at all really.

I was thinking of trying to saw a longer log than my mill is supposed to saw by using the pipe method as long as I clamp the log while cutting, should work.

llamaman
llamaman's picture

I'm soaking all these ideas up like a sponge. I know I'll never look at a "firewood" log the same again!

swampbuggy
swampbuggy's picture

It will take a while but then every tree you look at you try to figure out if you can make a board out of it. Or a mantle, bar top, clock, table, bowl......enlightened...lol

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Dewchie, let us know how it works.  Maybe something like a hybrid carriage where you could move the log on the track on its own carriage with rollers so that you don't need to back the blade out of the cut each time.  The tricky part will be the first two slab cuts.  I've seen photos of it being done, but figure by the time I've milled two or three long logs, I'd be ahead to buy or build a track extension.

Dewchie
Dewchie's picture

Oakie, probably would be better to buy the deck extensions for long logs if you cut alot of them but it would work for say a 16' long log, cut on a 12'6 deck, which I have. Or even longer ones if there were only a few you needed to cut. Picture a 16' log set on two pipes as I mentioned set on a 12'6 bed as I have. Clamp it set the height for the first cut, then cutting in 12'. Then back off your blade, take your chain saw and cut the 12' slab off (without touching the the finish cut). Then unclamp, raise the carriage ,push the log toward the carriage to set the last 4' on the deck. Now take your 6' level put it on your first cut and with your house jack, level the log and clamp. Then set your carriage height to the first cut and away you go. Repeat this for your next side cut and then it is all down hill from there! That's what i will try this year. Just a thought!

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

Guess I'm being dense.  If the pipes lay across the track, how do you get the carriage to roll past the pipes while cutting?  How do you get the pipes to roll past the bunks, which are higher than the track?  Maybe I'm just not seeing it.  Will sleep on it.

Dewchie
Dewchie's picture

Sorry Oakie, I guess I should proof read better. You put the log on cut the first 12' then put pipes under, roll it then take pipes out, level it and make final cut. The pipes don't go beyond the bunks they will just rest against them. As you push the log the log rolls on the pipes as they roll. By the way I have rolled a couple logs last year like that because when I originally put them on the deck I was to far to the right and had to move it left. The logs were at least 22" in diameter. I was going to lever them with my pevey but noticed that I may bend the bunk as you mentioned earlier. That's when I thought of the idea. Saw it on the Frontier's of construction show about moving big stones in pyrimid building days and of course many movie shows, they used logs! Ironic !

Hope this makes more sense.

Cheers!

Post Oakie
Post Oakie's picture

OK, got it.  I wasn't kidding about being dense.  I've got some 16' trailer decking to cut, so I may give it a try.  Thanks for the idea.

papow22
papow22's picture

This is a extra heavy duty exhaust flapper,A diy job.I found this somewhere on the the net

  

papow22
papow22's picture

the plastic sawdust chute held with pop rivites 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KC_Masterpiece
KC_Masterpiece's picture

I like that loading system. Inspiration for my own, soon! Do you think tongs could be used instead of wrapping chains around the log?

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